Amy Burvall

Amy Burvall

 

  • TEDX speaker and Mozilla Fellow
  • Google Education Certified Innovator
  • 21-year teaching career
  • Google Academy award winner

Travels from Honolulu, Hawaii, San Diego and Vancouver. She often travels to the UK.

Contact Forte Speakers for Keynote and Workshop fees


Amy is an internationally acclaimed expert on developing creative skills. She can help integrate digital tools into daily workflow to increase knowledge share, insight and agility. Amy has designed and delivered programs in creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship across Asia, South America, Europe as well as the US. She can mesh analogue and online, theory and action with the aim of building confidence and a mission for action in her audience. So check out amyburvall.com for many more examples of her work.

She is a person who makes things happen: she has spoken at conferences and run workshops for large groups of professionals all over the world. She has a large and enthusiastic following wherever she goes. Amy consistently demonstrates how her contagious energy, hard work and flair for creative processes can unlock obstacles to productivity and inspire individuals and organizations to achieve their goals.

Amy will co-author a new book with Dan Ryder, a fellow educator an expert in design thinking. called Intention: Critical Creativity in the Classroom.  About the book: Critical Creativity is: Students using creative expression to demonstrate deeper thinking and the nuances of understanding content. When students make connections, transform knowledge, articulate the reason behind their creative choices, learning becomes more sticky, meaningful, and authentic. Intention should be released early in 2017. She is now starting to work in the L&D community, and is running a “Creativity Zone” at an event called “Learning Live” by the Learning and Performance Institute based in London.

Additional Information About Amy Burvall:

  • 20+ years independent school teacher (7 in Intl. Baccalaureate)
  • Google Certified Innovation Leader
  • Google Academy Award winner (Atlanta Class of 2014)
  • Mozilla Foundation Fellow (first cohort) and beta tester; Web Literacies consultant
  • TEDxHonolulu 2011 speaker
  • TEDxHonoluluED 2013 organizer/curator/ photographer
  • History for Music Lovers project; featured in Wired magazine, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, Honolulu Magazine, CBC, NPR, and international blogs and media.
  • Beta tester, Paper by Fifty-Three app (sponsored sketchnoter at SXSWEdu2015 for Paper) and Universe app
  • Associate consultant: WeAreOpen Coop (UK) and EdSpeakers (Intl.)
  • Keynotes at RSCON, Alan November’s BLC, AdobeEdu, KQED, Federation of Independent Schools of British Columbia, South Carolina Midlands, CUE, AACE, SXSWEdu (EdTechWomen Ignite) and ISTE (Ignite), and many others.

As a professional keynote speaker, Amy is known for:

  • being inspirational
  • using metaphor, rhyme, and alliteration for “stickiness”
  • drawing her own images for her slide decks (which are primarily image-based, with relatively little text)
  • live tweeting all of her slides and sharing via Slideshare at the close
  • using interactive elements such as think/pair/share and always including a challenge or call to action at the end (Amy encourages use of the conference social media backchannel as well)

 

KEYNOTES and WORKSHOPS

Image is Everything: Exploring Critical Thinking with Visual Literacies

From cave walls to Facebook walls we have always embraced visual communication. Dual coding theory of cognition reiterates the importance of visual imagery in respect to our thinking processes ­ that in fact we need visual language in addition to verbal or text­based coding of stimuli. With the changing media landscape, our streams, memes, and zines have exploded with imagery, ushering in a need for visual literacy skills. We are quickly moving from images as decoration and augmentation to images as sole content and communication tool. We have some false beliefs about visual language ­ that it is equated with “art”, requiring “talent” from “creative types” ­ and therefore it is unfortunately often not overtly taught and practiced in schools. Technology has affected knowledge in such a way as to diminish the value of “raw” information and increase the value of sense­making, as well as chip away at attention spans, sparking a need for distillation of complex ideas. Images can essentialize the cumbersome in beautiful ways. They have a “stickiness” for the viewer and challenge the critical thinking of the creator.

This hands-on session will explore the “Whys” of visual literacy and offer participants an opportunity to tinker and play with:

  • iconography and metaphorical thinking
  • pictograms, “Shortology”, emoji, meme stories, and gifs
  • graphic design, graphic facilitation, infographics and sketchnotes
  • photography, cinemagrams (moving photos)
  • icon­based annotations and marginalia
  • using images to leverage CVs, social media, and presentations

We’ll experiment with ways to use visual language for personal knowledge management,

amplification of knowledge and creative work, critical thinking, social interaction (conversation),

and other forms of creative and intellectual expression.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 3­4 hour or all day hands-on workshop

 

The Power of Play the Why of Whimsy (*new)

Most of our first learning comes from play, so why do we often stop promoting play as we progress through school and our careers? We know that play boosts cognitive, social, linguistic, emotional, and physical development. Albert Einstein noted that “Combinatory play seems to be the essential feature in productive thought”. In the shift from the Industrial economy to the

Knowledge and Creative economies, knowing how to leverage play and humor for learning and communication is increasingly important. Students, teachers, and professionals need to unlearn stifling patterns and relearn the habits of daily, dedicated play. Comedian John Cleese claims that “he who laughs most, learns best”, and that “if you want more creative workers, give them time to play”. If play is the new literacy, then how do we do we become play­literate?

This hands-on session explores the Power of Play and the “why’s” of Whimsy, particularly in education but in our personal intellectual and creative lives as well. Participants will have the opportunity to tinker with remix and mashup projects and develop strategies to foster playfulness and creativity on a daily basis. We’ll look at embracing play, scheduling ­ (yes, scheduling!) play, cultivating a mindset that encourages play, and creating spaces that enable play. Because “men do not quit playing because they grow old, they grow old because they quit playing” (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.).

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 3­4 hour hands-on workshop

What Would Da Vinci Do? Lessons from Great Artists’ Lives and Creative Processes

Process over product. After the “writer who draws” Austin Kleon released his best­selling Show Your Work, educators found resonance in his message of transparency, particularly in respect to the amplification of student work ­ both process and product ­ on the Open Web. While an artist’s oeuvres might be the thing that garners the most attention, what drives them and makes them tick is often the most intriguing. We can gain valuable insight by peering into artists’ lives and creative processes and apply this to our own intellectual and creative pursuits. What big takeaways from the likes of Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Picasso, Van Gogh and others can help us rethink our teaching, working, and living?

This presentation can be given as a keynote format, varying in length from 10­60 min.

It can also be crafted into a hands-on participatory session described as follows:

In this session participants will first learn about the lives and creative processes of pivotal visual artists that shaped their artistic output. We will then visualize and “soundbit­ify” our big takeaways collaboratively and create unique manifestos based on our findings. Finally, we will brainstorm practical uses for these “lessons from the artists” ­ both in our lives and work/ classroom spaces. This session/talk is for anyone interested in how creativity works and how to foster creative thinking, perseverance, and resilience in oneself and one’s students.

 

New Literacies ABCs (*new)

A truly unique talk based on the “new literacies” necessitated by technology and its effect on knowledge, creativity, and communication. Framed as an ABC book, this whimsical presentation is conducted in rhyming couplets with engaging original visuals. The intellectual “meatiness” of the content is not lost due to format, however. The audience should walk away with an understanding of a wide scope of these “new literacies” and how to embrace, teach, and practice them in personal, informal and formal learning environments. (examples include: amplification, bricolage, curation, digital storytelling, fieldwork, micro-content, remix, peeragogy, transmedia and visual thinking)

Note: Best as a keynote­style talk but can be adapted into a participatory workshop.

 

The Cloud is our Campfire: Crowdsourced and Combinatorial Creativity

The Open Web is facilitating the power combinatorial creativity like never before. While creativity has always been about remix and “standing on the shoulders of giants”, our networks now allow for boundless creative connections and collaborations. What happens when hundreds or even thousands contribute even the smallest bit to the project pie? How can educators and students participate in established crowdsourced projects, as well as develop their own? The Cloud has become our campfire, where we compose and share stories with the ever increasingly varied media available to us. Technologist Dr. David Weinberger famously noted that “The smartest person in the room IS the room” ­ can we then apply that concept to creativity? Could what we make together be more poignant, more powerful, and more interesting than anything we could have created individually?

In this session participants will explore various established projects and imagine how they might be applied in their courses or professional development plans. We’ll also take some time to ideate one or more original projects that could be implemented with existing tools.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 3­4 hour hands-on workshop

 

Digi­logue: Hybrid Creativity with Analogue Plus Digital (*new)

Digital technology has undeniably changed the art and media landscape, with new tools, apps, and platforms for creating popping up almost daily. However, we have not lost our appreciation for the hand­crafted, traditional arts ­ in fact, it is obvious that a certain nostalgia is brought on by our inundation of computer­based art. We have Instagram filters emulating the hazy tones of Polaroid photography, and meticulously executed claymation replacing CGI in full­feature films. Many creatives swear by keeping a Moleskin journal or sketchbook, and graphic recorders are often filmed as they draw the main points of a keynote. There are blogs devoted to blackout newspaper poetry, book spine poetry and Lego poetry. This session will explore the marriage of digital and analogue, and generate ideas about using everyday physical objects in our digital creations, particularly for storytelling with film and photography. The concept is a wonderful example of “bricolage” (“tinkering”) ­ using the diverse tools and materials at hand to construct something new.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 3­4 hour hands-on workshop

 

The “new” MTV Generation: Mobile, Transliterate, Visible (keynote)

The first MTV generation were the ultimate consumers of mass media ­ characterized by the affinity for the visual and the desire for diversion. They demanded the fast­paced and were able quickly process information, albeit riddled with uncertainty. This culture was the springboard for a new sort of media landscape­ one that even further breaks away from the privilege of print and whose power has shifted from that of the hierarchical to that of the participatory and crowd­based. What it means to be “literate” in this environment is mercurial, but we can identify some major trends and help our students by cultivating these “new literacies” in the classroom…and beyond. The remixED “MTV” stands for “Mobile, Transliterate, and Visible.”

How can we leverage the power of mobile technology and social media to engage learners in relevant ways? What types of literacies are emerging, and what academic, technical, and social skills should we address to help our students succeed in exponentially changing world? How can we embrace transparency and help students wisely and effectively share and amplify their work on a global scale?

*best as a keynote but potentially can be adapted to be participatory workshop

 

RemixED: The Power of Remix, Mashup, and Recontextualization in the Classroom

Mozilla Web Literacy creator Doug Belshaw says that the “heart” of “digital literacies” is the Remix. Kirby Ferguson eloquently encouraged us in his TED talk to “Embrace the Remix”, because, as his enlightening documentary series reminds us, “everything is a remix”. Newspaper blackout artist and award­winning author Austin Kleon’s advice to budding creatives is to “Steal Like an Artist”, because “you are a mashup of what you let into your life”. Our students are engrossed in remix culture ­ they are the appropriation and re-contextualization generation. Remix calls for knowledge and understanding, critical, higher­order, and design thinking, a variety of tech skills, and, frequently, collaboration and navigation in the greater media landscape. Most importantly a remix task offers students a chance to truly transform a work and create something unique ­ something that will contribute to their digital presence and legacy. This session is part pedagogical/philosophical and part participatory. Attendees will leave with a “goodie­bag” of resources and ideas as well as have the opportunity to develop, practice, and share several types of remix projects.

For this workshop I have developed an ever­growing G+ community to organize resources, and serve as a space for sharing participant work and continuing the conversation long after the conference has ended. The slide show offers a glimpse into the history of remix in the art world and its significance in our present media landscape. We’ll explore how different techniques of remix and mashup lend themselves to collaborative creativity and differentiation in the classroom. We’ll also look into the distinctions between “remix” and “rip­off” and discuss the ways in which to help work become transformative rather than mere copies. There will be some discussion of copyright reform, fair use, and creative commons as well. Philosophically we’ll look at the work of William Burroughs, Grandmaster Flash, and Andy Warhol as well as the more recent efforts of writer Austin Kleon, media theorist Henry Jenkins, MIT Media Lab Lifelong, Kindergartener Mitch Resnick, documentary filmmaker Kirby Ferguson, and the online course DS106.

The workshop is peppered with a variety of hands-on activities, where we will use both digital and analogue tools and materials to create individual and collaborative projects. We will also play a version of “Disruptus”, a divergent thinking game that sharpens design­thinking skills. We’ll explore how social media in particular inspires recontextualization and re­imagining. And, in an era of ever­abbreviated communication, we’ll look at various ways to essentialize and synthesize into more minimalist, visual interpretations.

All participants should bring their own device and ideally have created a G+ profile as well as YouTube channel. It would also be extremely helpful to have a camera on one’s phone or the ability to take and upload images easily.

Background – Note from Amy

I’ve been actively involved in remix culture and its use in education since starting the History parody music video channel, “History for Music Lovers” on YouTube. That experience and my interests in creativity, remix, and digital storytelling has led me to present and keynote at various edtech conferences. I have done a TEDx talk (TEDxHonolulu 2011) and several Ignite talks, and recently spoke with EdtechWomen at SXSWEdu14. I offered this particular session at EdTechTeacher’s iPad Summit in San Diego (Feb. 2014) as a one hour presentation and as a keynote online with Shelly Terrell’s RSCON14. I have created a G+ community with resources for participants that serves as a digital space to share work and keep the conversation going long after the conference closes. As a Mozilla Webmaker Fellow I had the opportunity to beta test some of their remix tools in Fall 2013 as well as present my crowdsourced creativity projects “Serendipidoodle” and “Needoji” at Mozfest 2014 in London. I have appeared in several international publications of various media (print and digital) as well as being featured in Renee Hobbs’ new book Discovering Media Literacy , Steve Wheeler’s Learning with E’s: Educational Theory and Practice in the Digital Age, in T. Mills Kelly’s book Teaching History in the Digital Age, and in Curt Bonk’s The World is Open: How Web Technology is Revolutionizing Education.

*can be a 1 hour talk; a 3­4 hour workshop or all day workshop (very hands­on)

 

Critical Creativity: Meaning Through Making

Objectives:

  • Participants will identify benefits of creative expression as a means of deeper understanding
  • Participants will experiment with creative exercises and strategies applicable across the content areas
  • Participants will design a plan for integrating creative expression into their impact areas

How might we choreograph an epiphany, remix an analysis, doodle a movement, costume a theme, hashtag a philosophy? We believe acts of making needn’t be limited in size or scope method or medium, nor need they be mere exercises of imagination or engineering. Creation reveals comprehension. Our students’ increasingly diverse toolbox for expression, both analog and digital, emboldens the creative spirit into a force for authentic understanding, a vehicle for demonstrating proficiency. Come with an open mind and nagging curiosity; leave with a concrete plan and bevy of strategies for integrating innovative imagination into your daily classroom practice.

  • can be a 4 hour or an all day workshop

 

#getsmART: Lessons from the Artists

While everyone is both a work of art and an artist, not everyone thinks like one. What can the ways in which famous artists lived their lives, as well as their creative processes, teach us? In this interactive keynote, Amy Burvall shares poignant takeaways from the lives of DaVinci and Michelangelo, the Impressionists, Toulouse Lautrec, Picasso, and Warhol. Through anecdotes, quotes, and metaphorical imagery, these apologues serve as digestible life lessons educators and leaders can embrace in their own intellectual and creative lives and share with students.

I5 ­20 min TED style keynote or 1 hour keynote with participatory elements

 

What Would da Vinci Do? Lessons from Great Artists’ Lives and Creative Processes

Process over product. After the “writer who draws” Austin Kleon released his best­selling Show Your Work, educators found resonance in his message of transparency, particularly in respect to the amplification of student work ­ both process and product ­ on the Open Web. While an artist’s oeuvres might be the thing that garners the most attention, what drives them and makes them tick is often the most intriguing. We can gain valuable insight by peering into artists’ lives and creative processes and apply this to our own intellectual and creative pursuits. What big takeaways from the likes of Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Picasso, Van Gogh and others can help us rethink our teaching, working, and living? In this session, which is a participatory extension of the #getsmART keynote Amy Burvall presented at BLC2015, participants will first learn about the lives and creative processes of pivotal visual artists that shaped their artistic output. We will then visualize and “soundbit­ify” our big takeaways collaboratively and create unique manifestos based on our findings. Finally, we will brainstorm practical uses for these “lessons from the artists” ­ both in our lives and work/ classroom spaces. This session/talk is for anyone interested in how creativity works and how to foster creative thinking, perseverance, and resilience in oneself and one’s students.

  • 4 hour workshop

What if…? Exploring Creative Ways to Re­Imagine Curriculum, Learning Spaces, and Learning Communities

The artist Pablo Picasso famously quipped: “Others have seen what is and asked why. I have seen what could be and asked why not” What if we approached education with that attitude? This session offers probes to get us thinking about re­imaging everything from the way our courses are structured, to the physical and virtual learning spaces in which we work, to our local and global learning communities through which we thrive.

Participants will take away some practical tips and suggestions, but will also have the

opportunity to start designing a personalized “what if…?” plan and contribute to the collaborative thinking space created for the session.

  • 1 hour or up to 4 hour session

 

The Magic of Metaphorical Thinking and Combinatorial Creativity

“Metaphorical thinking — our instinct not just for describing but for comprehending one thing in terms of another, for equating I with another — shapes our view of the world, and is essential to how we communicate, learn, discover, and invent” ­ James Geary

With increased emphasis on fostering creativityin students in order to prepare them for the demands of an uncertain and complex workforce and world, there is an increasing need for practicing creative thinkingstrategies. How do students develop into more divergent thinkers? How can they become the most effective “storytellers” in order to explain and amplify their ideas? Metaphorical thinking ­finding interesting relationships and connecting dots in new ways­ is perhaps the most challenging yet stimulating of all aspects of the creative process.

This session will explore some of the theory, then offer practical pedagogical exercises which help nurture this type of thinking. Participants will have a chance to practice these strategies first­hand and contribute their work to a collaborative learning space created for the session.

  • 1 or 2 hour session

 

Cultivating #newliteracies

How can we model and help our students develop skills in the new literacies of the digital world? How does one “craft a tweet”? What are the nuances of hashtagging? What are the aesthetics necessary for effective vlogging? How do we cultivate and maintain a positive presence in social media? Our students are the “prosumer”, publishing generation and require social and media skills that transcend physical space. This presentation will offer tips, tools, and examples to assist in integrating and supporting the “new literacies” in one’s classroom and beyond.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 3­4 hour hands-on workshop

 

#onceuponahashtag: Storytelling and Storyfinding with Social Media

Storytelling is an integral part of our personal and educational lives. We share micro­stories every day on a variety of platforms, yet frequently fail to recognize the hidden poignant tales embedded in the hashtags and status updates. This session will explore some innovative uses of social media tools (Twitter, Tumblr, Flickr, Instagram, Storify, etc.) that can lead to story creation or “story-finding”. Since social media is inherently social, many of these projects involve crowdsourcing and collaboration. Inspire your students’ creativity, learning, and cultivation of web literacies ­ the possibilities are endless. You can even emulate some of the ideas in an analog fashion for younger students.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 2­3 hour hands-on workshop

 

Mobile Sapiens: How Mobile Technology Can Re­Humanize Us

There is much concern that our devices are chipping away at our humanity. Some fear that through our use of mobile technology in particular we are becoming less attentive, less compassionate, less aware, and unable to “live in the moment”. This talk acknowledges but challenges those assumptions by exploring the various ways in which our mobile tech can

actually serve to re­humanize us by fostering connections to ourselves, our creativity, and to our fellow man.

*originally the closing keynote to Adam Bellow’s opening keynote at the Hawaii Island TechED Collaboration Conference (2014)    https://sites.google.com/site/ksedtechhi2014/keynote­speakers

*best as a keynote or 1-hour presentation

 

Make du Jour: Cultivating Creativity on a Daily Basis

 “There is no win, there is no fail, there is only make.” (John Cage). One of the greatest challenges is developing ideas, finding time, and offering opportunities for students work on creative projects. More importantly, how do we move beyond the “assignment” stage and encourage students to be intrinsically motivated to make beautiful things on a regular basis? How do we foster the shift from consumption to production? Even if you don’t have the luxury of offering a project­based curriculum, you can still develop a steady diet of ongoing, “back­burner” projects that gets student to “dare to make and share”. This session will explore ways to instill a creative culture in your classroom, with everything from low­entry point crowdsourced uses of social media to the #showyourwork movement which asks students to be overt about their design thinking, creative process, and troubleshooting and contribute to collective knowledge. At the heart of personalized learning is creative freedom, but students often need a spark of inspiration, a design brief, or mentorship to get them on the road to making. Finally, we’ll look at teacher­as­creator as well, and the importance of transparency and curation in facilitating creativity in the classroom.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 3­4 hour or all day hands­on workshop

 

Mobile Sapiens: Found Art and Story Scavenger Hunt Safari

Let’s break free from the hotel and explore our stunning surrounding environment, all while having fun with a scavenger hunt­style safari. Participants will need a sense of adventure, a mobile phone (list of relevant apps will be shared before the event), and a desire to create some found art and narrative. Experimenting with found art sharpens one’s senses and better prepares the mind for creative thinking ­ that is, connecting dots in unique ways. You can participate individually or in a team but will have only 40 minutes to explore and create before sharing with the rest of the group. Get ready to hone your playfulness and creativity and learn some engaging activities try with students.

*1 ­2 hour session partially OFF SITE exploration

 

Getting Meta: Augmented Video, Audio, and Images for Creativity and Critical Thinking

Description 1:

How do we inspire students to demonstrate both creativity and critical thinking? Kick up video production notch by encouraging augmentation ­ the careful addition of the “meta”. In this hands­on presentation/ workshop we’ll be exploring Web tools and apps that allow students to add rich layers to their visual and audio creations. Augmentation with external links, multi­media, and hypertext makes both original work and appropriated resources more “meaty”. Most tools allow for remix, collaboration, and crowdsourcing as well, so that students may hone key “21st century skills”. Experience each through play and experimentation, and showcase at least two of your creations with our group. How do we embrace the #showyourwork movement and ask students to demonstrate their design thinking processes and troubleshooting strategies, contributing to collective knowledge? These techniques are highly adaptable and applicable to almost any age and discipline.

Description 2:

Etymologically “meta” means “going above or beyond”. We live in a hypertextual world, and there are more and more web tools and apps that enable us to quantify and qualify ourselves and our creative work. This workshop explores some of the history of augmentation (such as medieval marginalia) up to its use today (think Google Glass). Participants will play with tools such as Thinglink, Touchcast, Soundcloud, Aurasma, and Diigo and create multi­layered enriched media artifacts they can use as instructional tools or as project ideas for students.

The workshop offers entry into a Google+ Community, rich with resources and serving as a digital hub for sharing work (present and future) and continuing the conversation long after the conference has ended. The slideshow is peppered with hands on activities and opportunities to collaborate and create. Participants will make augmented videos, interactive presentations, annotated images, text, and sound files, and play with apps that allow us to mark up our environments (like Fontly and Historypin). Finally, we’ll discuss the nuance of hash-tagging as a means to organize knowledge but also add “meta” commentary, and practice whimsical tagging in the educational context.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 2­3 hour hands-on workshop

 

New Literacies ABCs: A Collaborative, Crowdsourced Creative Experiment

Seeking poets and artists! A truly unique session based on the “new literacies” necessitated by technology and its effect on knowledge, creativity, and communication. Together the group will compose an ABC book ­ a whimsical manuscript conducted in rhyming couplets with engaging original visuals. Participants will be asked to work with each other in varying degrees and author descriptive, engaging poetic verse about their designated literacy. Those wishing to contribute their talents in the visual arts may do so as well. Everyone should walk away with an understanding of a wide scope of these “new literacies” and some ideas of how to embrace, teach, and practice them in personal, informal and formal learning environments. (examples include: amplification, bricolage, curation, digital storytelling, fieldwork, micro-content, remix, peeragogy, transmedia and visual thinking). The session will make use of both digital and analog collaboration and publishing tools.

  • 1 or 2 hour session

The Cafe, the Studio, and the Stage: Re­imaging Spaces for Blended Learning

Description 1:

It might sound like the Parisian Left Bank but it could be your course. It’s time to re­imagine the environments in which our students learn, whether we teach in a traditional classroom setting, offer a hybrid course, or teach completely online. One possible model is the “Café ­ Studio­tage”, which facilitates distributed cognition, peeragogy, maker culture, and radical transparency. What are the essential elements of these “spaces” ­ whether they be physical or virtual ­ and what tools are useful in managing student learning, production, and amplification of student work? The “Café” fosters community and is the hotbed for discussion of ideas, but can also include individual research and reflection, curation, and student­led teaching. The “Studio” provides the “whitespace” for students to produce artifacts. The synchronous aspect of “studio time”, even in a purely digital realm, is characterized by a creative energy much like the classic artist studio. It is a time for brainstorming, prototyping, collaboration, and for formative feedback.

Finally, the “Stage” constitutes the various platforms available to share and showcase student work and learning with the goal being a sense of relevance via an authentic audience as a well as the obligation to contribute to socially­constructed knowledge.

Description 2:

It might sound like the Parisian Left Bank but it could be your course. What are the Whys, How’s and Wows of crafting your course into a blended experience? How do we best harness the power of the Open Web’s tools and resources to achieve a truly personalized learning environment? How can the structure of cMOOCs (“connected massive open online courses”) play a role in shaping how students learn, both collaboratively and independently? How do we decide what the balance of face­to­face, synchronous, and asynchronus learning should be?

This highly participatory workshop will allow you to experience a variety of authentic tools and strategies as we examine the structure of such a flexible, student­centric course, designing with the analogy of the “Cafe”, the “Studio”, and the “Stage” in mind. We’ll explore the role of curation, remix and crowdsourcing and the subsequent “new literacies” involved when we exploit social media and other open resources for educational use. You will practice vlogging and back-channeling, and see how such activities can facilitate critical reflection, participatory culture, and higher­order thinking. We’ll discover ways to promote radical transparency and assist students in amplifying their work and connecting with experts in the field. The combination of curation, creation, reflection, and amplification leads to the cultivation of a positive digital presence, where students not only consume but contribute to knowledge production.

This workshop requires participants to have a mobile device and (preferably) a laptop. High­speed bandwidth is necessary, as we will be accessing multiple social media sites and uploading small clips to YouTube. Participants will be highly active in engaging in relevant activities they can replicate in the classroom (MS Higher ED) and using design thinking to develop an action plan for implementation. A full website of resources curated by the presenter is available as a take­home “goodie­bag.”

*can be a keynote, a 1 hour talk or possibly adapted to a hands­on workshop

 

Choice and Voice: Cultivating Personalized Learning Strategies for Assessment and Reflection

In an age when most information is “Googleable” how do we craft assessment tasks that allow our students to demonstrate creativity and critical thinking? How can we give them opportunities to both demonstrate their learning, and their ability to applytheir knowledge? This session explores some unique assessment tasks and the (mostly) web­based tools students need to accomplish them.

All the assessment and reflection strategies presented will be driven by the need for student choice and voice in their presentations of knowledge. All are based on one or more essential questions, which are open enough to apply to a variety of subjects. The session will offer tips, tools, and examples of a variety of non­traditional projects such as vlogging, blogging, digital storytelling, “artifact bag” analysis, social media curation, multi­media presentations, and website building.

Video blogging is a refreshing way to transform more traditional assessments such as essays into creative, student­driven presentations of knowledge. This presentation will offer tips, tools, and examples, including a variety of styles such as Common Craft, RSA animate, documentary, stop­motion, screen capture, and the ubiquitous “talking head.” You will find that, when students vlog, they are generally more passionate about demonstrating and reflecting on their learning, and even the more timid individuals can often gain confidence, allowing for a different perspective on their progress.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 3­4 hour hands-on workshop

 

Infographicmania: Telling Stories with Data

We are increasingly bombarded with “data viz” – artifacts from a field immersed in math, science, art, design, technology, and storytelling. How can students navigate through the mass amount of data and information using critical thinking skills and apply this to their studies? Better yet, how can students and educators learn to find the stories hidden in data, and create their own interpretations using DIY infographic strategies and tools? This session will explore recent trends in data visualization and how various forms of infographics can be used

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 2­3 hour hands-on workshop

 

Students as Curators: Now What?

More and more educators are becoming enthusiastic and adept at curating resources for their course and own professional development. But what about our students? How can we encourage students to cultivate a positive digital presence (and be “Googled Well” as Will Richardson says), by allowing them to curate content for their courses? This session will not only discuss the “whys and how’s”, but the “so what now’s?” Once students collect relevant content, how do they make it meaningful for themselves and others? How does their curation contribute to peer learning and how is it reflective of their own? We’ll explore practical ways to get your students curating and using their curation to enrich your course and their learning.

*best as a 1 hour talk but can be adapted into a workshop

 

Vlogging for Assessment and Critical Reflection

Video blogging is a refreshing way to transform more traditional assessments such as essays into creative, student­driven presentations of knowledge. This presentation will offer tips, tools, and examples, including a variety of styles such as Common Craft, RSA animate, documentary, stop­motion, screen capture, and the ubiquitous “talking head”. You will find that when students vlog they are generally more passionate about demonstrating and reflecting on their learning, and even the more timid individuals can often gain confidence, allowing for a different perspective on their progress. Get started with participating in the VoxBoxED21 Project Amy developed with fellow teacher Casey Agena ­ join in a global community of “confession box” vloggers using simple tools such as custom niches, iPads, and velcro. The slide show offers many examples of professional and student vlogging for a variety of purposes such as formative and summative assessment, reflection, archiving project­based learning, exploring controversies, inspiring change, professional development, and evaluating tools or events. We’ll then examine the different types of vlogs, including more imaginative styles using visual thinking skills.

Participants will be offered entry into a Google+ Community created specifically for this presentation. It serves as a space for resources, sharing work, and keeping the conversation going long after the conference has ended. Attendees will have a chance to practice at least one type of vlog and post to the community, as well as design their own “voxbox” for their learning space.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 2­3 hour hands­on workshop

 

Stop­Motion Makery: Analogue Marries Digital

One of the wonderful things about the myriad of digital tools is that they can be used to enhance the beauty of the analog ­ the “old school” hand­drawn, hand­constructed and hand­written elements we are so nostalgic about. Perhaps one of the best methods of showcasing this is through the use of stop­motion animation. This session offers a myriad of tips and exemplars (both student and professional) of various types of stop motion as well as an opportunity to practice and produce a project first­hand. Digital Storytelling with stop­motion animation can be quite poignant and truly allow students a chance to demonstrate their knowledge and creativity, while honing skills such as collaboration and troubleshooting / divergent thinking. Mediums include clay, paper, food, magazine cut­outs, drawing materials, post­its and we will also look at 3­D stop motion and simple kinetic typography. *We will be using a stop motion app, so a mobile device (pref. iPhone or iPad is necessary).

*can be a 1 hour talk but best as to a 3­4 hour hands­on workshop

 

Creative Cinema for Critical Thinking

How do we inspire students to demonstrate both creativity and critical thinking? One way is to kick up video production a notch by encouraging augmentation ­ the careful addition of the “meta”. In this hands­on presentation/ workshop we’ll be exploring Web tools and apps that allow students to add rich layers to their visual and audio creations. Augmentation with external links, multi­media, and hypertext makes both original work and appropriated resources more “meaty”. Most tools allow for remix, collaboration, and crowdsourcing ­ key “21st century” skills.

Another effective digital storytelling technique is stop­motion animation. Stop motion enhances the beauty of the analog ­ the “old school” hand­drawn, hand­constructed and hand­written elements we are so nostalgic about. Films of this type can be quite poignant and truly allow students a chance to demonstrate their knowledge and creativity, while honing skills such as collaboration and troubleshooting / divergent thinking. This session offers a myriad of tips and exemplars (both student and professional) of various types of stop motion as well as an opportunity to practice and produce a project first­hand. Experience each through play and experimentation, and showcase at least two of your creations with our group. These techniques are highly adaptable and applicable to almost any age and discipline. (*laptop and mobile device required, and you will be asked to download a stop­motion app) Tools used:

  • Popcornmaker, TED Ed, Weavly, YouTube, Thinglink, Soundcloud, Touchcast, Treehouse, and
  • Stop­Motion Pro App
  • Digital Vikings

*can be a short Ignite up to a 1 hour talk (but could possibly be extended into a longer, hands­on workshop)

This session emerged from a blog post I wrote trying to grapple with the notion of a “digital native/immigrant” dichotomy. The post resonated with many from around the world, as I was part of a MOOC of 40,000+ people. This concept breaks through the generalization and instead identifies, embraces, and encourages a new type of inhabitant in the digisphere­ the Digital Viking. Being a Digital Viking a mindset, rather than a skill set or accident of birth. But exactly what does that entail ­ what does the analogy imply and how can it be useful in cultivating a similar mindset in your school? This session outlines the 5 major characteristics of the Digital Viking and offers practical strategies for each. Participants will leave with a “Viking Tool Box” addressing everything from curation, to creation, to personal branding.

 

Hastaggery: Harnessing the Power of the Tag for your Course

“The tag is the soul of the Internet”, says Derrick de Kerckhove in The Augmented Mind. How can educators exploit the use of tagging content in a variety of mediums in order to help students practice these new literacies and understand the workings of the Web? In this session we’ll look at both practical and creative (or “meta”) tagging and explore ways to organize a course in Twitter, G+, Storify, Instagram, and WordPress blogs. We’ll explore playful uses of tags to recontextualize, add commentary, or create art, poetry, and literature. The hashtag is a powerful device of the organization of knowledge, but it can be maximized for critical and divergent thinking.

*this is a presentation with hands­on activities. Please bring a mobile device and, if you wish, a laptop. *can be a 1 hour talk up to a 2­3 hour hands­on workshop

 

Leveraging for Legacy: Personal Branding for Students and Educators

How can we be, as Will Richardson states, “Googled well”? This presentation includes a web­based tool kit we’ll used to explore platforms, strategies, and netiquette to create and share our work to a global audience in order to leverage the Web for our “legacy”. Based on the concepts of Curation, Creation, Connection, Collaboration, and Promotion, we’ll examine the use of blogs, vlogs, social media, digital portfolios, infographic resumes, YouTube channels, and curation / social bookmarking tools. Whether you choose to develop a personal brand for yourself, or intend to help your college­bound students do so, this workshop is for you. Time allowing, we will be creating at least one infographic c.v. within the session.

Have you ever wanted to consolidate your professional and personal achievements, activities, and aspirations into one swanky digital “hub” that can be easily shared? The first (or sometimes last) step in creating an online portfolio is to develop a landing page or simple c.v. that can highlight your stats, interests and accomplishments. In this session we’ll explore tips in cultivating your “personal brand” as a professional educator and play with some great infographic resume tools. You will leave the class having developed at least one simple but effective digital business card, and having access to loads of resources to help you get started building that portfolio.

Here’s a blog post to whet your appetite:

http://amysmooc.wordpress.com/2013/01/26/leveraging­for­legacy/

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 2­3 hour hands­on workshop

 

Leveraging for Linchpins: Personal Branding for the Professional

If you are an entrepreneur, or a creative leader in your field, you are more significant than your current situation. It’s time to leverage the web to show how indispensable you are. In his best­seller Linchpin, Seth Godin identifies linchpins as people who “stand out…invent, lead (regardless of their title), connect others…make things happen…delight and challenge their customers and peers…and turn each day into a kind of art”. How do you go about creating a personal brand that transcends your company? This workshop offers tips on clever and responsible use of social media, as well as elegant and innovative tools to augment your digital presence and networking.

*can be a 1 hour talk up to a 2­3 hour hands­on workshop

 

Dare to Share: Radical Transparency in Education

This custom workshop was designed for teachers using the iPad at the beginner to intermediate level. Various pedagogical strategies involving digital storytelling (including vlogging) with the ipad are discussed, demonstrated and practiced, as participants critique student work then create a variety of individual and small­group projects (including, iMovie trailers, short films, silent films, vlogs, and stop­motion animation).

*best as a short talk ­ originally an Ignite but could possibly be extended into an hour. Please see this from ISTE : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0TbGtND2Nk

iPad Cinema Workshop (3­4 hours) *designed to be 3­5 hour hands­on workshop

 

The Gutenberg Parenthesis: What the Changing Media Landscape Means for Knowledge from Bards to Bits: Storifying History in the Digital Age

The technology of the 21 st century has allowed us to emerge from mere media consumers to thoughtful creators, developing a rich, trans­media environment colored by the power of storytelling and social engagement. We are, in effect, able to return to a pre­Gutenberg world of oral history and remix culture. Students of this connective era are immersed in social interaction on a global scale, and have at their disposal a wealth of platforms and tools to use to create and share their stories. They do not want to receive­they want to “do” ; they learn by creating, as well as teaching others, and seek critique from authentic audiences well beyond the classroom doors. When students conduct inquiry­based historical research, what are they to do with it? How can they practice the role of the historian by crafting and sharing “stories”? How can teachers and students reach the higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy by using presentation and curation freeware, social media, and multi­media editing tools? How can they synthesize and transform information into an artifact that will both display and spark empathy and passion for the subject?

Objectives:

∙ understand the impact of the Gutenberg Parenthesis and trans­media in education

∙ learn to facilitate self­directed learning, project­based learning, choice, design­thinking, historical thinking and inquiry, and integrated units in the Social Studies classroom

∙ learn about and practice strategies and freeware tools that encourage creativity and research­based storytelling in the History classroom

∙ examine ways in which to share students’ work globally and with an authentic audience, which allows for increased engagement and more authentic assessment

 

Other formats include:

  • Online Keynotes
  • Panels
  • Interviews / Guest Spots / Hangouts
  • Podcasts

 

GENERAL SPECIALTIES:

public speaking / keynote

creativity and innovation / creative thinking and collaboration

visual thinking strategies

developing learning cultures

technology / learning integration

blended learning experiences / social media and mobile learning

instructional design / course development

“train-the-trainer” / professional development

personal branding (leveraging for legacy)

future of learning

digital storytelling

rethinking learning spaces (both digital and physical)

radical transparency

 

SPECIFIC SPECIALTIES:

emerging / web literacies (including vlogging, blogging, leveraging

visuals, social media, etc.)

remix culture

sketchnoting / metaphorical and visual thinking and literacy

Gutenberg Parenthesis Theory (media)

portfolio assessment

data visualization in education

arts and history (cross-curricular ties)

creativity and innovation (cross-sector)

crowdsourced creativity

cultivating creativity on a daily basis

serendipitous creativity

power of play and whimsy

critical thinking through making / design thinking

curation and critical consumption (knowledge management)

augmented media

project and challenge-based learning

social / networked learning; cultivating personal learning

networks (PLNs) and strategies

narrative and changemaking

rocking the presentation (cutting edge presentation strategies)

Lessons from the artists: learning about learning

The new MTV Generation: Mobile, Transliterate, Visible

Mobile Sapiens: How Mobile Tech can Re-Humanize Us

 

TESTIMONIALS

“Because of her high output of creative and thought-provoking ideas, I’ve followed her on a variety of media. If you do that, you’ll see what a font of creativity she is. I would be delighted to take a course on creativity from her. She’s adept at teaching teachers, encouraging agency and community among students, and feeding her personal learning network” – Howard Rheingold, http://www.rheingold.com/howard/

“She is tenacious and has boundless energy, and she never seems to stop. I believe this is because she has a burning desire is to help as many people to learn as she possibly can. She does this through her writing, videos, photography, artwork, live sketching (see Graffikon), keynote speeches and her very popular workshops on creativity, making and learning” Steve Wheeler, author and futurist  https://steve-wheeler.net/

“Amy provided a wildly popular keynote at my summer conference on creativity for a global education audience representing more than 25 countries. Amy is a superstar presenter.”  Alan November, November Learning

 “Amy is an inspiring and incredibly prolific, creative educator! She models the way learners of all ages can and should use visual media to deepen understanding and communicate effectively with others. Her “5 C’s of Sparking Innovation” video in the 2014 K-12 Online Conference pre-conference keynote is a great example of using visual notes in a quick edit video to effectively communicate!” Dr. Wes Fryer

“Amy is a powerful voice in the areas of creative expression and knowledge sharing…Most recently when I asked people to share video stories of connection, she not only provided one; she gave me ten (http://stories.cogdogblog.com/ten‐stories/). That says a lot about her willingness to share her creativity with the world. There is only one Amy Burvall.”  Alan Levine

“Amy Burvall is a creative inspiration for so many educators worldwide. Having been a Lead Learner at the Google Teacher Academy where she was a participant, Amy was an instant draw for insight and motivation based on her insight to creative thinking for both teachers and students. Witnessing some of the best educators in the world challenge their thinking based on her guidance was an unforgettable moment of my professional career.” Mark Hammons of EdTechTeam, Google Innovative Educator/Certified Trainer, Apple Distinguished Educator, Breakout EDU Chief Operating Officer

“Amy Burvall brings a fierce intensity to any project on which she works. Her contagious energy and creative approach to professional learning is a breath of fresh air, and is certain to brighten up any event. Amy is a whirlwind of creative energy that all educators must experience.” Mike Lawrence, CEO of CUE.org

“After Amy Burvall’s presentation at Schools of the Future, several of the teachers at Mid-Pacific were simply blown away. The language arts and social studies teachers in particular had been struggling with pedagogical questions about technology and new literacies for students. I quickly arranged for our own workshop with Amy on our campus. She broke a few thinking routines that day and helped build new ones. Amy has an insightful and accessible coaching style that helped my teachers to thrive and grow.” Thomas McManus, High School Principal, Mid Pacific Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii

“It was my pleasure to work with Amy as part of Mozilla Foundation’s Mozfest 2014. I helped to run a strand at the festival called #ArtofWeb. Amy was one of a group of curated international artists that created work that reflected on the participatory nature of the Web. Amy had an installed piece but also ran a weekend long workshop that encouraged participants at the festival to create their own work that became part of her piece. Her thoughtfulness in thinking about how to facilitate the creativity in all of us was inspiring and was reflected in the popularity of her workshops.” Paula Le Dieu

“Amy is one of the most dynamic speakers and educators I’ve had the pleasure of meeting. We met at a panel at MKThink called On Site/Off Site: Cultivating Physical and Virtual Learning Spaces where she represented the full spectrum of physical and virtual learning though her inspiring lessons and stories that ignite the perpetual student in us all to embrace and celebrate our inner artist.” Shannon Grant, Head of Membership, The Tugboat Group

“During the five years that I managed the Hawaii Schools of the Future Initiative, Amy Burvall was an education resource called upon again and again.  Although she was a full-time teacher, she made herself available many, many times to assist teachers at other schools in understanding and implementing project-based learning in their learning environments.  And she was doing this not only in Hawaii, but invited to do so all about the world.

 Amy is an excellent presenter, collaborator, technology genie – that unusual blend of educator, artist and techie who is able to make others comfortable with integrating the latest tech innovations into their classrooms through art and music. I watched with amazement as Amy introduced a group of Korean K-12 teachers who had never heard of the concept of “project-based learning” to strategies for implementing PBL into their learning environments in Korea.  Within 90 minutes, she had them designing projects that they could take back to their classrooms in Korea.”  Philip J. Bossert, Ph.D., Hawaii Association of Independent Schools (HAIS)

“Amy Burvall always brings energy and vibrancy into any room she enters. She works with and inspires teachers and students alike. Amy has shared her creativity and dared my students to share theirs. She has inspired generations of students to create history videos, and her legacy in this realm is enduring. 

Amy packed the room at the British Columbia Social Studies Teachers Association Conference 2 years in a row with her memorable workshops on emerging literacies, digital storytelling, and technology integration.

Amy’s professionalism, her percolating energy, and her creative ideas make me always want to see her keynote speeches and attend her workshops. She motivates me to do more and better every day in my classroom. I consider Amy to be what I call a “mind crush,” one of the intellectuals near or far who has impacted my practice and spurred me on intellectually, creatively and professionally.” Brenda Ball, Director, Brockton School. Formerly BCSSTA Conference Chairperson and Department Head, Crofton House School

“Amy’s engaging presentation at Harvard-Westlake Middle School (California) was truly game changing for me. Our time together helped bring a degree of clarity to my emerging understanding of new literacies. I am amazed that ideas that she introduced to me over a year ago continue to influence and shape the way that I think about and use new media personally; and the way that think about, teach about, and use new media with my students.” Dave Wee; Director of Library Services, Mid-Pacific Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii; formerly Harvard-Westlake Middle School, California

“Amy is a skilled and gifted presenter, delivering a powerful message about creativity and empowering student voice and choice. She is also one of the most well-prepared presenters I have ever worked with, putting in lots and lots of hard work behind the scenes to ensure that everything runs smoothly. She is truly a gifted and inspiring teacher, empowering other teachers to innovate and enhance what they do in their own classrooms.”  Douglas Kiang; Academy Mathematics; Chair, Academy Curriculum Committee; Punahou School; Apple Distinguished Educator

“Your keynote presentation at the International E-Learn Conference in Honolulu back in October 2011 is a case in point. With your keen abilities to interweave cutting edge learning theory and emerging technologies with captivating stories and rich and creative video examples, you had the audience in the palm of your hands. It was among the best presentations I have seen in my 26 years in academia. We all wanted an encore. Finally, I should point out that I admire your ceaseless curiosity and creativity.” Curtis J Bonk; Professor, Indiana University, Instructional Systems Technology Department, Adjunct, School of Informatics

 

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